122 History of Marshfield.  

[Thanks to Sarah Sully for transcribing this chapter]

Smith—Zenas Thomas—John Dingley—Thos. Waterman Jr.—Joshua Carver—Joseph Kent—Peleg Foord—Lot Howes Silvester—Benj. White—Asa Waterman—David Carver—Jos. Hewitt—John Waterman—Nathnl Thomas—Thos Fish—John Sherman—Wm. Thomas Jr.—Jere. Low—Saml Tilden Jr.—Luther Peterson—Benj. Tolman—Samuel Oakman—Briggs Thomas—Jethro Taylor—Gershom Ewell—Elisha Kent—Samuel Williamson—Wm Clift—Timothy Williamson—Nathan Thomas—Jos. Bryant—Jos. Clift."
   What more sitrring and patriotic utterance was given to the people than this, proclaimed a year and a quarter before the signing and issuing of the Declaraton of Independence, and promulgated in a town (our town, it must be said, with a pang of sorrow), yes, a town which was the hotbed of toryism.   The fathers of Marshfield, that is, the solid, substantial yeomen, had the daring, the strength and the courage of their convictions, and were not afraid in those heroic times to speak out, and the promulgation of that document places these patriots of Marshfield in the front rank with the early fathers of the Revolution.
   W. T. Davis, in Plymouth County History, says: "Those who had resisted the popular movement were not permitted to go unpunished.   Nathaniel Ray Thomas, characterized in 'McFingal' as that 'Marshfield blunderer,' an educated and influential man, and a graduate of Harvard, a man living on an estate including 1500 acres (since occupied by Daniel Webster), was proscribed and banished, his property was confiscated and during the remainder of his life, which ended in 1791, he made Nova Scotia his home.   Ephraim Little, Cornelius White, John Baker, Joseph Tilden, John Tilden, Stephen Tilden and Nathaniel Garnet were imprisoned in Plymouth Jail for their toryism and released by order of Council, October, 1776, on condition they would pay the expenses of prodeedings against them and remain on

 

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