[Thanks to Linda Smith for transcribing this chapter]

CHAPTER XLII.

1861.

The Civil War.

   "May 1—$5,000 was voted at the town meeting for the defense of our rights, also a bounty of ten dollars to be paid to all persons who have or may enlist as soldiers whenever they shall be accepted and mustered into service, also voted to increase the monthly pay of each soldier to $25, who has been accepted and mustered into service, extending to those who may be drafted alike, with those who have or may enlist.   Ordered that five dollars per month be added to those soldiers who have families.   The patriotic services of the ladies, who have volunteered to make clothing, &c., for the soldiers, were accepted."
   "July 6—One dollar per week was ordered to be paid by the town to the wife, & also one dollar per week to the children under 16 years of age of any citizen of this town, who has or may become a member of the volunteer militia of this state, and said pay shall commence when mustered into service of the United States, and shall continue until otherwise directed by a vote of this town at a meeting called for that purpose, but the amount shall not exceed 12 dollars per month to any one family; and also one dollar per week shall be paid to each parent, brother or sister of the volunteer, who at the time of his enlistment was dependent on him for support, and the Selectmen shall have the power to decide on any doubtful cases.   Also voted that those articles of clothing in the hands of the Selectmen be distributed by them to the volunteer soldiers, and if there should not be sufficient on hand for all of the soldiers, the Selectmen are hereby directed to procure them when called for."

168

 

Previous  Contents  History Contents  Families Contents  Next

Copyright © 2010 by Dale H. Cook. All rights reserved.