CHAPTER IV.
SOLDIERS FROM MARSHFIELD WHOM I HAVE INTERVIEWED CONCERNING
THEIR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES AND OBSERVATIONS IN THE CIVIL WAR.


CHARLES S. PETERSON.

   "I enlisted Aug. 8, 1862, and was in camp at Lynnfield till the 26th, when we broke camp and started for Baltimore; arrived there on the 28th and went into Camp Belger.   Then to Camp Cram.   We could hear heavy fighting not far away, so the pickets had very strict orders; and one night I halted one on Powhattan bridge.   It was no cross for him to use profane language, so you may judge there was a lively time for a while; but finally the officer of the day came and passed him in.   The following day he admitted he was wrong.   I was appointed orderly sergeant, and being short of a base drummer, I was coaxed to act as such, although a novice in the business.   We left Camp Cram and marched to Camp Emery, about one mile from Baltimore.   We broke camp there the 7th day of November, with the snow seven inches deep, and I did not get into quarters until one o'clock the next morning.   The 8th we started for Fortress Monroe; remained at Hampton Roads till Dec. 4th.   We started aboard the Baltic, the largest ship afloat, with 17 other transports, said to contain 18,000 men, with sealed orders to steer due East till out of sight of land, and to keep together.
   "While going out between Cape Charles and Henry, there came a terrible storm, and the next morning there was only two in sight, and one of those was disabled.   We anchored at New Orleans, Jan. 1, 1863.   On the 6th of March

 

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